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Search Results for "Recording"

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Technology has modernized the way we consume and create music. Today’s smartphones are very powerful devices with fast processors. Wireless data speeds have increased exponentially in just a few years. We use our iOS and Android phones for everything from live streaming video to real-time navigation. Developers are constantly creating new apps that benefit content producers, DJs and live musicians. Check out a few of our favorite high-tech gadgets to see how you can use your iPhone or Android phone for professional music production, performance or recording.
Necessity is often the mother of invention, as was the case with the Neumann U67. In the late 1950s, Neumann received the devastating news that the Telefunken tube used in its then-premier tube condenser microphone, the U47, would be discontinued. One last production run of Telefunken VF 14M tubes supplied Neumann with enough to sell U47s into the early 1960s, while the process of creating Neumann's new studio standard began.
During our recent visit to the UK, we stopped by the home studio of Mary Spender – a YouTube-based musician whose channel has already amassed a whopping 6.2 million views thanks to her “Tuesday Talks” YouTube series, in which she deep dives into music topics of her choosing with artists like K.T. Tunstall, James Valentine and more. We joined Mary for a Tuesday Talks of our own, covering the topics of her YouTube origins, evolving her process as a musician through social media, and how to kickstart your own YouTube channel with just an iPhone and a great mic.
Every year, innovators from around the globe descend on Las Vegas for CES, the largest consumer technologies trade show in the world. With CES 2019 upon us, one category that continues to gain a greater presence is musical instruments and equipment. Guitar Center recognizes the huge impact that advances in technology can have on musicians and how they create, produce, listen to, and share their music.
Likely, the most subjective microphone placement in all of recording is the room mic for a drum set (or perhaps a room mic for any instrument setup for that matter).  As with any recording, the sound concept you have in mind should lead the decision making process.  In other words, what is the intent?
If you’re finding yourself with a limited budget resulting in limited gear, you’re certainly not alone.  The good news is technology has come a long way from the days of being limited to any sort of multi-track recording outside a 4-track recorder.  Now, the most cost effective of digital audio workstations, paired with the power of today’s computers, provide us all with nearly unlimited options for recording multiple tracks, multiple takes, and multiple versions.  However, even with these advantages, we still need a decent instrument and decent microphones to lay a strong foundation for a finished record.  Thankfully, almost all live instruments can be recorded with just one or two microphones. 
All that’s required to record guitar is you, your electric guitar (or acoustic/electric), a cable and a computer with some freemium digital recording software. However, amps, mics, external preamps and other gear play a crucial part in crafting a great-sounding record. Let’s break down some reasons to look at these additional tools. Depending on where you are in your journey, we also have some tips for success when recording with a minimal setup.
Many like to use both a mic and a DI (direct box) when recording acoustic guitar. However, each can serve a purpose individually as well. It all comes down to the intent. The primary reason to use a mic is to capture the tonal qualities the human ear hears when the instrument is played. On the other hand, a DI converts string vibrations (from the magnets in a pickup) to electrical signals and can have a sound more similar to an electric guitar. Certain types of pickups, like piezos, function more like actual microphones, converting the physical vibrations of the instrument to a voltage, which produces a less “electronic” sound.
JBL's 3 Series MkII monitors feature Image Control Waveguide technology, which delivers an exceptionally broad listening area that will let you hear your music with incredible depth, revealing the subtlest details in even the densest mixes.

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