FREE 2-Day Standard Ground Shipping (edit) Get Details

More Info About Free 2-Day Standard Ground Shipping

Close Window
Top Seller

Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor  

Item #: 
1274034482841
  • Write a Review

The Lexicon MX400 is a single-rackspace, 4-in/4-out unit combining an intuitive front-panel design with Lexicon's "Hardware Plug-In" technology, a unique USB connection, and a VST/AudioUnits interface... Click To Read More About This Product

Price:
$29995.00
Add to Wish List

QUESTIONS?
Connect with an expert instantly.

Call us: 866-498-7882

 
PICK UP IN STORE Available in: 3-7 Days (estimated) Denver, CO (5.5  mi) Change Pick Up Store


,
SUN:11AM-7PM
MON-FRI:10AM-9PM
SAT:10AM-8PM
  • Pro Coverage Eligible
  • Free Shipping
  • International Shipping
Overview

The Lexicon MX400 is a single-rackspace, 4-in/4-out unit combining an intuitive front-panel design with Lexicon's "Hardware Plug-In" technology, a unique USB connection, and a VST/AudioUnits interface for use with software recording platforms.

Studio pros will be glad to know that the units also feature a wide array of the rich, complex reverb algorithms, delays, effects and dbx dynamic effects that have made Lexicon a favorite for recording.

The USB Hardware Plug-In format gives you complete plug-in control over your MX400 within any VST or AudioUnits software environment, enabling you to control all automation and recall parameters exactly as you would with a software plug-in while enjoying the sonic benefits Lexicon firmware provides.

Equally at home for live applications, the MX400 supplies the FOH/live sound engineer intuitive front panel control with a backlit LCD screen for parameter displays. 4 in, 4 out 1/4" TRS balanced I/O. Also offers 4-channel surround algorithms.

Features
  • 17 legendary Lexicon reverbs
  • Lexicon delays & modulation effects
  • dbx compression and de-essing
  • Quad-processor design
  • 7 effect routing options
  • 99 Factory/99 user programs for Stereo mode
  • 99 Factory/99 user programs for Dual-Stereo mode
  • 25 Factory/25 user surround programs
  • USB "Hardware Plug-In" feature with
  • VST and Audio Units plug-in software
  • MX-Edit Editor/Librarian software
  • Dual S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
  • 24 bit, 48kHz/44.1kHz sample rates
  • Large front panel LCD display
  • MIDI IN and THRU
  • 1/4" balanced/unbalanced TRS I/O
  • Analog Audio Inputs connectors: 4 - 1/4" TRS balanced or unbalanced
  • Impedance: 50k Ohms bal., 25k Ohms unbal.
  • Input Level: +4 dBu nominal, +24 dBu maxium 48kHz or 44.1kHz
  • A/D Conversion: 24-bit, 48kHz 128 x oversampling
  • Analog Audio Outputs
  • Frequency Response: 10Hz - 20kHz +0 dB/-0.5 dB
  • THD+N: Dynamic Range: 109dB (A-weighted) A/A
  • Crosstalk: Typical Digital input and output: Dual RCA phono format S/PDIF 24-bit
  • Sample rate: 44.1 or 48kHz
  • Frequency Response
  • 10Hz-22kHz ±0.5 dB @ 48kHz
  • USB 1.0 for MX-EDITª Editor/Librarian and VSTª/Audio Units plug-ins
  • MIDI
  • Footswitch jack (footswitch sold separately)
  • In/Out 5-pin DIN
  • 1/4" phone jack
Specifications
  • Power: 117 VAC or 230 VAC, 18 Watts
    Size (W/H/D)
    19" x 1.75" x 7.25"
    Weight: 5.8 lbs.
Warranty

GUITAR CENTER'S PRO COVERAGE
Pro Coverage gives you added warranty protection for your new gear. Stepping in where the manufacturer's "normal wear and tear" coverage ends, our Pro Coverage program offers you upgraded coverage if your product ever fails Read More.

Pro Coverage includes
  • Accidental damage protection (new gear only)
  • Expedited repair
  • Free shipping (for returns or repairs)
  • 100% coverage for commercial use
  • Extended return period
  • Extended price protection
  • No lemon guarantee
  • Free transfer of coverage to a new owner
  • Repair costs covered for up to three years from date of purchase
  • Repair authorization-toll-free by phone or via the web
  • Customer Reviews
Loading....

Review Snapshot

by PowerReviews
LexiconMX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor
 
4.0

(based on 17 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (10)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (2)

50%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Good audio (4)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Home studio (4)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Experienced (3)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

AWESOME!!!

Alright, first off, the disc that came with this unit to use it as a VST plug for Cuebase was not compatable with Vista. This proved to be no problem as the download...Read complete review

Alright, first off, the disc that came with this unit to use it as a VST plug for Cuebase was not compatable with Vista. This proved to be no problem as the download for Vista is on the lexicon web site. Secondly, Cuebase or other recording software will try to assign the mx400 as a midi device, and you will need to disable this function in your recording software for it to open the mx400 as a VST plug in. This was also a minor issue. If used as a VST plug in, the sound must be ran through the S/PDIF Digital Input/Output to your computer as the USB connection is not set up to run sound. Third, the mx400 has the best vocal effects I have ever heard. The presets are absolutly awesome and I dont forsee that I will ever have to make a custom setting. To utalize the full surround sound of this unit you will need a mixing board with aux 1 and 2 sends and 4 returns or a usb adapter that has at least 6 plug ins. Don't let any of this scare you, as this unit is awesome and well worth the few tiny issues I have ran into. If you are interested in taking your recordings to the next level or you just need an awesome live sound, the mx400 is the BOMB!

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

I Feel Deceived

Virtually everybody who buys a multi effects unit uses it in a superficial way. It's the same old: "I bought this for the reverbs and delays and they're awesome". What...Read complete review

Virtually everybody who buys a multi effects unit uses it in a superficial way. It's the same old: "I bought this for the reverbs and delays and they're awesome". What about all the other stuff! That's why you see so many reviews praising this unit and not mentioning the hidden limitations, lack of info in the manual, and bizarre behavior of the thing. I've only had the unit a few days and here's what I've learned about it that you won't find in the manual or in other reviews.

BAD POINTS:

One of the main reasons for buying the MX400 (or MX300) over the MX200 (or two MX200's) is for more parameters to adjust for each effect, rather than just the three the MX200 limits you to. To my shock, those extra parameters only show up when you're running just a single effect in one of the engines. As soon as you dial in a routing setup that uses two effects at once, all those in-depth effects parameters disappear and you're bumped down to the same three per effect as in the MX200. So if you want to run all four effects at once, the MX400 turns into two MX200's under one roof, but without the MX200's ease and speed of patch creation. If you want the extra effects features and parameters, you'll have to limit yourself to just two effects total on the MX400. This is unacceptable and totally deceptive and of course not mentioned in the manual. Not why I bought the MX400.

Adding to the above, the reduced set of parameters per effect also means missing functionality even when it's using the same knob. For example the phaser and flanger lose their ability to do negative feedback, the phaser rate gets limited to a slower rate (not even fast enough to do opening to Gary Numan's Cars), can't select number of phaser stages, two voice pitch shifter becomes one voice and loses it's feedback delay, etc.

The MX400 manual lists Arena and Studio reverbs, but they aren't available when running a single effect in an engine. They only appear in the menu when changing to a dual effect routing. Just the opposite for the 2 Tap Delay, which disappears altogether when running a dual effect routing.

A written manual is supposed to tell the user everything about a piece of gear. Not so with the brief MX400 manual (Lexicon's manuals have been going downhill with every new series they release). For instance, the Chorus can be set to 99 voices. But it's not really a 99 voice chorus. So how many voices is it? The manual won't tell you. Had to look back to the MX200 manual to find that the MX400 probably can go to 8 voices. How are those voices positioned in the stereo field and are they in some kind of phase with each other or free running? Even the MX200 manual doesn't say, so I had to go back to the MPX100/MPX500 manual to find out. Does the pitch shifter detect pitch and want only a monophonic input? Had to go back to the MPX100 manual. How many stages is the phase shifter when in reduced MX200 edit mode? Had to do a side by side listening test between MX400 and MX200 to find out (appears to be 8 stage). Can patches be named on the MX400 or do you have to use the PC editor? I had to buy the unit to find out because the manual wouldn't tell me.

EFFECTS GOOD & BAD:

(Flanger) Unlike everybody else, Lexicon provides through zero flanging (or a simulation of it) and also negative and positive feedback. Growing up on Tomita, this is what I want. However, if you don't want that climax and near sound canceling result, it doesn't seem like you can get away from it. There is no manual parameter for setting the center freq and no way of stopping the sweep altogether and using it as a fixed comb filter or resonator.

(Phaser) Also provides negative feedback as well as positive which is rare and can be set to 4,8,12 stage, but as above, no manual freq control so no fixed comb filter.

(Pitch shifter) Faster response time than older MPX100/500 units, but just about as lousy sounding. Held mic up to youtube video for some solo instruments playing and it sounded halfway decent until orchestra came in, so I thought maybe it was detecting pitch. But after plugging in a synth and running clean tones through it, it sounds lousy on some monophonic notes. So far TC Electronics and Lexicon have the worst sounding pitch shifters of any gear I own. Roland and Behringer do better in this department, though they all are somewhat lousy. When the delay/feedback option is available, you can create rising or falling pitch shifted sounds. Unfortunately Lexicon didn't give enough feedback amount, and the sound dies off too soon. The older MPX100/500 were far better at this IIRC.

(Delays) There are a number of them and with something like the Tape Delay, I was hoping that one could rotate the delay time knob and speed up and slow down the delay like on a real tape (or analog) delay. You can, but it introduces glitches or bad artifacts making it useless for that kind of thing. I have a lot of free VST plugins that can do that just fine. As owner of a Lexicon PCM-41 I was hoping the Modulation Delay would allow all kinds of extreme stuff like massive sweeps or square wave modulation, but no. The mod amount knob only gives a mild chorusing sound to a delay.

QUAD UNIT or just DUAL STEREO:

The MX400 is basically two separate stereo units under one roof. One engine has no clue the other one exists. That means you can't use all 4 effects on one stereo input/output. You'll need to duplicate inputs and mix outputs, or if you want to run 4 effects in series, you'll need to plug MX400 outputs into other inputs. Patches don't save all 4 effects at once, you have to load each half separately. Seeing how the surround reverb can use just 2 inputs and output to 4, it seems like had Lexicon not been lazy, this could have been a more flexible stereo unit utilizing 4 effects at once. The surround capability almost seems like it's there just because they could. There is just one hall algorithm and nothing else. Even just a quad panning effect would have been nice. Would like to have seen a global LFO on this unit for modulation effects in sync.

FINAL:

So the MX400 is a mixed bag of good and bad. I wish companies would put more pride and thought into their products rather than just repackaging the same old effects into new products with little attention to detail. If you're looking for a good dual reverb unit that does most of your standard effects (although no EQ), the MX400 should work fine. If you're looking for a powerful and creative effects unit that can create some really strange and original sounds, then this is not it.

Reviewed by 17 customers

Displaying reviews 1-10

Back to Top

Previous | Next »

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
2.0

You get what you pay for

By Mike

from Minn, Mn

About Me Experienced

Pros

  • Clear Sound
  • Easy To Use

Cons

  • Poor Quality Duplicates

Best Uses

  • Home Studio
  • Professional Recording

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

I've bought a lot of gear over the years and have learned the hard way what to buy and not to buy. Most of the pro sounding reverb units cost over one grand, and the consumer level stuff is low cost. When I bought the MPX400, I thought the price would get me something a little better than the lower end units, but it doesn't. It just gives you a lot more of the same old marginal effects. Before you get stuck buying endless consumer level stuff, get to know what the pros are using so that you have something to compare to. You might find that after listening to the pro level stuff that it would be better to save your money and buy a pro unit instead of a consumer level unit you will never be happy with. They keep making the consumer level stuff because we keep buying it! When you get a piece of top of the line gear, you will never go back. Do your research and listen carefully to everything. An expensive digital mixing board with cheap ad/ad converters/pre-amps can destroy your music. The world would be a much better place today if the music companies just gave us the very best stuff in smaller quantities.

 
4.0

second review

By aliengtr

from Bloomington, IN

About Me Professional Musician

Pros

  • Clear Sound
  • Professional Functions

Cons

  • Limited Functions

Best Uses

  • Amateur Recording
  • Home Studio
  • Performances
  • Professional Recording

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

for guitar: ok, I was totally against this unit because i tied to run it in "dual stereo " mode. running outputs A into output B. it just doesn't work well as far as patches go and I wrote a review for it.

however,I have been running it in simple 2 effect "stereo" mode and the difference is stunning. Now the mx-edit software works as it should and while you don't get all the reverb possibilities the one you do get sound great and it is the cleanest processor I ever owned. in a guitar rack or in an f/x loop it works great. Just be aware that your getting 2 effects (not 4) and not all the effects are available in this mode,but the sound quality is outstanding.

 
3.0

not well thought out

By aliengtr

from bloomington

About Me Professional Musician

Pros

  • Clear Sound
  • Powerful
  • Professional Functions

Cons

  • Difficult To Use
  • dumb ui
  • Unreliable

Best Uses

  • Amateur Recording
  • door stop
  • Home Studio

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

I just cant believe this over sight on the mx400, no wonder they never came out with the mx500. of all the bonehead ideas,ok put 4 effects in one box but let the patches only recall 2 f/x and the other effects have to be loaded/changed via a midi controller or loaded separately after the first two?!?!

. Patches don't save all 4 effects at once, you have to load each half separately.

man this unit would have been really cool,but what a bonehead move. might as well get 2 separate processors, (as here you are not getting 2 separate processors but more like 1 and 1/2) and not have to deal with this aggression.

(2 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

Almost Perfect But...

By Robert Preston

from San Diego, CA

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

I just picked up one of these over the holiday and was super excited. It was relatively easy to set up using spdif for the audio. I use Ableton 64 bit and was surprised that after installing the MXedit software i did not see them show up in my plugins folder. Then I thought of course I can use JBridge to use these plugin because they are probably 32 bit. As you all know JBridge only works on vsts. I ran it found vsts for mx200 and mx300. Turns out there is no vst for mx400 and there is no free bridge interface for AU. Contacted the manufacturer add this is the response I got: Robert, Unfortunately there are no plans at this time to update MX-Edit to 64-bit. We do not have a VST version of the plugin for the MX400, AU only on MAC. Shane Vander Veur Technical CS Harman Signal Processing Sorry it's 2013 everyone has already or is moving to 64 bit. This could have been a nice addition to my studio...

(5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

Almost Perfect But...

By RPreston

from San Diego,CA

About Me Experienced

Pros

  • Easy To Use
  • Hardware Reverb

Cons

  • No 64 Bit Support

Best Uses

  • Performances

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

I just picked up one of these over the holiday and was super excited. It was relatively easy to set up using spdif for the audio. I use Ableton 64 bit and was surprised that after installing the MXedit software i did not see them show up in my plugins folder. Then I thought of course I can use JBridge to use these plugin because they are probably 32 bit. As you all know JBridge only works on vsts. I ran it found vsts for mx200 and mx300. Turns out there is no vst for mx400 and there is no free bridge interface for AU.

Contacted the manufacturer and this is the response I got:

Robert,

Unfortunately there are no plans at this time to update MX-Edit to 64-bit. We do not have a VST version of the plugin for the MX400, AU only on MAC.

Shane Vander Veur
Technical CS
Harman Signal Processing

Sorry it's 2013 everyone has already or is moving to 64 bit. This could have been a nice addition to my studio...

 
5.0

Awesome Lexicon reverb sound and easy to use

By Chris Capozzoli

from Moorpark CA

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

This is extremely easy to use. If you treat this as two separate effects processors A and B which can have two effects each, you'll have no problems working with it. I like the fact that you load in user or factory presets individually into processors A or B. That's what makes this unit so easy to use. The reverbs are legendary awesome sounding Lexicon verbs. Chorus, DBX Compressors and DeEssers are good as well. Signal to noise is excellent. I can see myself using this in the studio as well as live, especially for the reverbs. If you want to run it as a multi-effects processor for a guitar just hardwire the stereo outs of A directly into the inputs of B. Or leave it hooked up to an effects rack with a patch bay so you can use it either way. The software is easy to use but I wish both A and B channels were visible at once on the computer screen. You have to switch between both. That would be useful especially as a guitar player setting up a string of effects. The main bypass switch is handy as well as the individual bypass switch. It's relatively easy to turn off each effect quickly from the front end panel. You can run the unit as dual mono input if you'd like for processor A or B. The older Ensoniq DP4 series allows that. With any effects unit you'll have to play around with the parameters for each effect to get more familiar with it. I wish I could monitor compression threshold levels realtime but that may make this piece of gear slightly more expensive. Overall I give this five stars especially for ease of use and sound quality.

 
5.0

Lexicon Reverbs are awesome, easy to use

By Chris Capozzoli

from Moorpark, CA

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

This piece of gear is extremely easy to use. If you treat this as two separate effects processors A and B which can have two effects each, you'll have no problems working with it. I like the fact that you load in user or factory presets individually into processors A or B. That's what makes this unit so easy to use. The reverbs are legendary awesome sounding Lexicon verbs. Chorus, DBX Compressors and DeEssers are good as well. Signal to noise is excellent. I can see myself using this in the studio as well as live, especially for the reverbs. If you want to run it as a multi-effects processor for a guitar just hardwire the stereo outs of A directly into the inputs of B. Or leave it hooked up to an effects rack with a patch bay so you can use it either way. The software is easy to use but I wish both A and B channels were visible at once on the computer screen. You have to switch between both. That would be useful especially as a guitar player setting up a string of effects. The main bypass switch is handy as well as the individual bypass switch. It's relatively easy to turn off each effect quickly from the front end panel. You can run the unit as dual mono input if you'd like for processor A or B. The older Ensoniq DP4 series allows that. With any effects unit you'll have to play around with the parameters for each effect to get more familiar with it. I wish I could monitor compression threshold levels realtime but that may make this piece of gear slightly more expensive. Overall I give this five stars especially for ease of use and sound quality.

(26 of 28 customers found this review helpful)

 
3.0

I Feel Deceived

By Elhardt

from Cary, NC

About Me Experienced

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Clear Sound

Cons

  • Limited Functions

Best Uses

  • Home Studio

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

Virtually everybody who buys a multi effects unit uses it in a superficial way. It's the same old: "I bought this for the reverbs and delays and they're awesome". What about all the other stuff! That's why you see so many reviews praising this unit and not mentioning the hidden limitations, lack of info in the manual, and bizarre behavior of the thing. I've only had the unit a few days and here's what I've learned about it that you won't find in the manual or in other reviews.

BAD POINTS:

One of the main reasons for buying the MX400 (or MX300) over the MX200 (or two MX200's) is for more parameters to adjust for each effect, rather than just the three the MX200 limits you to. To my shock, those extra parameters only show up when you're running just a single effect in one of the engines. As soon as you dial in a routing setup that uses two effects at once, all those in-depth effects parameters disappear and you're bumped down to the same three per effect as in the MX200. So if you want to run all four effects at once, the MX400 turns into two MX200's under one roof, but without the MX200's ease and speed of patch creation. If you want the extra effects features and parameters, you'll have to limit yourself to just two effects total on the MX400. This is unacceptable and totally deceptive and of course not mentioned in the manual. Not why I bought the MX400.

Adding to the above, the reduced set of parameters per effect also means missing functionality even when it's using the same knob. For example the phaser and flanger lose their ability to do negative feedback, the phaser rate gets limited to a slower rate (not even fast enough to do opening to Gary Numan's Cars), can't select number of phaser stages, two voice pitch shifter becomes one voice and loses it's feedback delay, etc.

The MX400 manual lists Arena and Studio reverbs, but they aren't available when running a single effect in an engine. They only appear in the menu when changing to a dual effect routing. Just the opposite for the 2 Tap Delay, which disappears altogether when running a dual effect routing.

A written manual is supposed to tell the user everything about a piece of gear. Not so with the brief MX400 manual (Lexicon's manuals have been going downhill with every new series they release). For instance, the Chorus can be set to 99 voices. But it's not really a 99 voice chorus. So how many voices is it? The manual won't tell you. Had to look back to the MX200 manual to find that the MX400 probably can go to 8 voices. How are those voices positioned in the stereo field and are they in some kind of phase with each other or free running? Even the MX200 manual doesn't say, so I had to go back to the MPX100/MPX500 manual to find out. Does the pitch shifter detect pitch and want only a monophonic input? Had to go back to the MPX100 manual. How many stages is the phase shifter when in reduced MX200 edit mode? Had to do a side by side listening test between MX400 and MX200 to find out (appears to be 8 stage). Can patches be named on the MX400 or do you have to use the PC editor? I had to buy the unit to find out because the manual wouldn't tell me.

EFFECTS GOOD & BAD:

(Flanger) Unlike everybody else, Lexicon provides through zero flanging (or a simulation of it) and also negative and positive feedback. Growing up on Tomita, this is what I want. However, if you don't want that climax and near sound canceling result, it doesn't seem like you can get away from it. There is no manual parameter for setting the center freq and no way of stopping the sweep altogether and using it as a fixed comb filter or resonator.

(Phaser) Also provides negative feedback as well as positive which is rare and can be set to 4,8,12 stage, but as above, no manual freq control so no fixed comb filter.

(Pitch shifter) Faster response time than older MPX100/500 units, but just about as lousy sounding. Held mic up to youtube video for some solo instruments playing and it sounded halfway decent until orchestra came in, so I thought maybe it was detecting pitch. But after plugging in a synth and running clean tones through it, it sounds lousy on some monophonic notes. So far TC Electronics and Lexicon have the worst sounding pitch shifters of any gear I own. Roland and Behringer do better in this department, though they all are somewhat lousy. When the delay/feedback option is available, you can create rising or falling pitch shifted sounds. Unfortunately Lexicon didn't give enough feedback amount, and the sound dies off too soon. The older MPX100/500 were far better at this IIRC.

(Delays) There are a number of them and with something like the Tape Delay, I was hoping that one could rotate the delay time knob and speed up and slow down the delay like on a real tape (or analog) delay. You can, but it introduces glitches or bad artifacts making it useless for that kind of thing. I have a lot of free VST plugins that can do that just fine. As owner of a Lexicon PCM-41 I was hoping the Modulation Delay would allow all kinds of extreme stuff like massive sweeps or square wave modulation, but no. The mod amount knob only gives a mild chorusing sound to a delay.

QUAD UNIT or just DUAL STEREO:

The MX400 is basically two separate stereo units under one roof. One engine has no clue the other one exists. That means you can't use all 4 effects on one stereo input/output. You'll need to duplicate inputs and mix outputs, or if you want to run 4 effects in series, you'll need to plug MX400 outputs into other inputs. Patches don't save all 4 effects at once, you have to load each half separately. Seeing how the surround reverb can use just 2 inputs and output to 4, it seems like had Lexicon not been lazy, this could have been a more flexible stereo unit utilizing 4 effects at once. The surround capability almost seems like it's there just because they could. There is just one hall algorithm and nothing else. Even just a quad panning effect would have been nice. Would like to have seen a global LFO on this unit for modulation effects in sync.

FINAL:

So the MX400 is a mixed bag of good and bad. I wish companies would put more pride and thought into their products rather than just repackaging the same old effects into new products with little attention to detail. If you're looking for a good dual reverb unit that does most of your standard effects (although no EQ), the MX400 should work fine. If you're looking for a powerful and creative effects unit that can create some really strange and original sounds, then this is not it.

(0 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Better than I could have hoped for

By StarterAcousticGuitar111

from Virginia

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

As I have only had it a few weeks, I will give it an 8 overall.
This is a very cool effects box. I have been slowly upgrading my much older (and I mean 20+ years) equipment in my PA rack. The effects was the last item I had on my list. I had used a DSP 128+ for the whole time and was happy with the performance (mainly because I did not try anything new). Until one time I was able to see this unit set up in for demo. I tried it out and was blown away. I have only had it a few weeks, but am very happy with my purchase as I am still learning of all the various effects and combination of settings I can make. I'm not sure you would need to wait 20+ years like me to upgrade, but when you do upgrade, this is the box that will do the trick.
Great value. I thought the proce was very reasonable.

(5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Lexicon-Can't go wrong MX400

By Marc Bolger

from California

Comments about Lexicon MX400 Dual Stereo/Surround Reverb Effects Processor:

I bought this unit because I needed some quality delays. The delays can go for a whole 5 seconds with these things. I wanted some quality delay or the ability ro have reverb that stomp boxes just don't do. But when I explored the Flange and chorus I about dropped a load in my pants. If you were to try and buy this if it were around in the 80's it would cost way bigger bucks! It really compares with high end stuff.

"It's a Lexicon"
It programs nicely. Easy to adjust and set parameters within a given effect. Im using it for the loop of my guitar head as opposed to people who may be computer plugging with it. There is a footswitch box that one can get to move up or down within channels. And the only thing that it doesn't do is layer more than 2 effects at a time,but I can live with that compared to it's quality and transparency through my signal. I only use a couple of things at a time anyway really.
Lexicon pretty much wrote the book on studio reverbs. Lexicon,Eventide...I was using the Rocktron Xpression side by side with this Lexicon MX400. I have ordered another MX400 and pulled the Xpression.
The Lexicon is actually less expensive and I think it is a better machine depending on what your needs are.
I would say that Lexicon is to the effects world what Marshall or Fender is to the guitar amp world if that makes any sense.
For all I use it for it's value and ease of function is stellar. For stage live use and for recording studio.
I use mine for my amps loop in the back. I mainly use ot for it's delays and reverbs-Modulation.
I love the flanging.

Displaying reviews 1-10

Back to Top

Previous | Next »

You are changing the Ship-To country.

Our product catalog varies by country due to manufacturer restrictions. If you change the Ship-To country, some or all of the items in your cart may not ship to the new destination.